Currently Reading / Just Read (Books/stories/whatever)

Talk about anything under the sun or stars - but keep it civil. This is where we really get to know each other. Everyone is welcome, and invited!
User avatar
Luet
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 4451
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:49 pm
Title: Bird Nerd
First Joined: 01 Jul 2000
Location: Albany, NY

Postby Luet » Thu Mar 10, 2011 9:50 am

timeline, Michael chrichton
Hey, I just acquired that book but won't have a chance to read it for quite some time. Let me know how it is when you're done?
I was going to say that it's good but not as good as OSC's Pastwatch. :)
"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer." - Albert Camus in Return to Tipasa

zeldagirl1234
Soldier
Soldier
Posts: 120
Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2010 5:40 pm
Contact:

Postby zeldagirl1234 » Thu Mar 10, 2011 12:42 pm

ah. I picked that book up from the library but never actually read it
When in need, you must be the savior to your kind. When not, you must conquer and take charge.

User avatar
CezeN
Toon Leader
Toon Leader
Posts: 1254
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:24 pm
Title: will not be ignored

Postby CezeN » Fri Mar 11, 2011 3:52 pm

Those are my ponderings, what are your thoughts?
You put a lot more thought in to it than me, but what you say makes sense. I think it's just part of what makes Kvothe, Kvothe as well. He's always been quick to anger; that's his major weakness.

But I think also, perhaps Bast is being a little extreme in his description of the Cthaeh. I think the Cthaeh just sets you on the path that will bring about the most destruction that you're capable of. The longer you listen to the tree, the more it can poison you to the people in your life and the more it can manipulate the events to its liking.

A thought I had after this book was that Pat Rothfuss is going to be writing another three books. He has two general storylines going right now. Kvothe's life and what happens after Kvothe's life. Kvothe and Kote. I have the feeling that book 3 will finish up Kvothe's story up to the beginning chapters of the first book, and then we're going to get another trilogy covering Kote after he told the story of his life. There is no way that we can finish Kvothe's life and also resolve things happening in the world at the time of the Waystone Inn during book 3.
Yeah, I think you might be correct. There's just not enough time to resolve both of those two sides of the plot, into a perfect story, with only one more book - regardless of the fact that his books are 900+ words long.

On one hand, I really hope that you're right, since I want Kote to start acting like Kvothe again, instead of this empty shell of himself.
On the other hand, Rothfuss takes a fucking long time writing books - so that might be another decade of waiting...

What do you think about Denna and her patron? I've read this theory about how Denna's patron may be one of the Chandrian, and that he/she's got her to learn to play the harp in order to rewrite their story and spread a different one with Lanre as the hero. (At the same time, they're killing off anyone who writes about their original story like Kvothe's family)

There's also theories I read about how Kvothe's name is locked up in his thrice locked box, that's why he can't really do sympathy or Ketan anymore. Because he's not really Kvothe anymore. Elodin did in fact hint at the idea that people can change their name, in the book.

More importantly, what's your thoughts on Kvothe becoming a manwhore and suddenly fucking everyone left and right?
Gunny and his thoughts on First Earth:
Image

User avatar
Wil
Toon Leader
Toon Leader
Posts: 1373
Joined: Sun Dec 31, 2006 8:07 pm
Title: Not the mama!
Location: 36° 11' 39" N, 115° 13' 19" W
Contact:

Postby Wil » Fri Mar 11, 2011 5:05 pm

On the other hand, Rothfuss takes a f****** long time writing books - so that might be another decade of waiting...

What do you think about Denna and her patron? I've read this theory about how Denna's patron may be one of the Chandrian, and that he/she's got her to learn to play the harp in order to rewrite their story and spread a different one with Lanre as the hero. (At the same time, they're killing off anyone who writes about their original story like Kvothe's family)

There's also theories I read about how Kvothe's name is locked up in his thrice locked box, that's why he can't really do sympathy or Ketan anymore. Because he's not really Kvothe anymore. Elodin did in fact hint at the idea that people can change their name, in the book.

More importantly, what's your thoughts on Kvothe becoming a manwhore and suddenly f****** everyone left and right?
I think he'll start writing faster now.

That's an interesting theory about Denna and her patron. Not sure what to think of that actually...

Kvothe's name being locked up is interesting, except I don't think he can totally lock it away. Given that Rothfuss will refer to Kote as Kvothe during the Interludes, it makes me think that perhaps stories are tied to names, and telling the story is bringing back some of his name. Or something like that.

He's not a man whore! He's just... 17! Yeah. :P

User avatar
Gravity Defier
Commander
Commander
Posts: 7863
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:32 pm
Title: Ewok in Tauntaun-land

Postby Gravity Defier » Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:44 pm

Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk: A Modest Bestiary by David Sedaris and illustrated by Ian Falconer (the guy who does the Olivia children's books)


I'm led to believe, after reading and in a strange way enjoying this book, that I have a peculiar sense of humor. It is a collection of 16 twisted fables/short stories, not equally strong but interesting all the same. My favorites were "The Parenting Storks" and the title story, "Squirrel Seeks Chipmunk."

I don't know that I can think of anything to compare it to, unfortunately, to give anyone an idea of what it's like but I believe one of the stories is online if you wanted to get a feel for it.
Se paciente y duro; algún día este dolor te será útil.

User avatar
Syphon the Sun
Toon Leader
Toon Leader
Posts: 2217
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2007 8:59 pm
Title: Ozymandias

Postby Syphon the Sun » Fri Mar 11, 2011 6:57 pm

regardless of the fact that his books are 900+ words long.
That's one pretty short book. ;)
Step softly; a dream lies buried here.

User avatar
locke
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 3046
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 1:07 pm
Contact:

Postby locke » Fri Mar 11, 2011 7:31 pm

Wise Man's Fear spoiler thread

I can't say for WMF or Rothfuss (I'm already addicted to Martin and Bakker I am NOT starting a new unfinished series with long waits between books) but I thought I'd provide the link because their discussion of Bakker is unparalleled (the martin discussion goes without saying) so I figure it'd probably also be good for Rothfuss.

Started a reread of AGOT and worked up a reread schedule to finish going through all four volumes of ASOIAF before ADWD releases in July.

Also trying to finish rereading The Judging Eye before White-Luck Warrior comes out next month.

and speaking of AGOT, I think I've watched this five or six times so far.

http://insidetv.ew.com/2011/03/03/game- ... w-trailer/
So, Lone Star, now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb.

User avatar
CezeN
Toon Leader
Toon Leader
Posts: 1254
Joined: Tue Aug 05, 2008 1:24 pm
Title: will not be ignored

Postby CezeN » Fri Mar 11, 2011 8:07 pm

Kvothe's name being locked up is interesting, except I don't think he can totally lock it away. Given that Rothfuss will refer to Kote as Kvothe during the Interludes, it makes me think that perhaps stories are tied to names, and telling the story is bringing back some of his name. Or something like that.
Yeah, I don't think it'd be totally locked away either.
Think back to the story of the guy who stole the Moon - he only managed to catch a piece of it's name in his box, so it was still free to move from the normal world to the land of the Fae, and back.

Of course, that was only in the fairy tale version. However, I interpret the part where he desperately tried to open the thricelockedbox as him trying to release his name, and becoming who he used to be. I believe he was practicing the Ketan at the end, where he "lifted his hands like a dancer, shifted his weight, and took a single perfect step."

But yeah, stories have such a significant role in the series. You're right. At the very least, his reminiscing seems to be making him want to return to how he was in his glory days.

Last, I think there's like a 99% chance that the Maer's new wife, the one who's sister ran away to join some Edem Ruh ravel!, the one who seems to look vaguely familiar, is his Aunt.
He's not a man whore! He's just... 17! Yeah. :P
lmao

Thanks Locke.
Gunny and his thoughts on First Earth:
Image

User avatar
Wil
Toon Leader
Toon Leader
Posts: 1373
Joined: Sun Dec 31, 2006 8:07 pm
Title: Not the mama!
Location: 36° 11' 39" N, 115° 13' 19" W
Contact:

Postby Wil » Fri Mar 11, 2011 9:46 pm

So, yeah, I've only read a few pages and I've already gone "Wait, WHAT? Why didn't I see that? Holy crap...!"... it makes me feel kind of sad that I didn't see half of these things.
Started a reread of AGOT and worked up a reread schedule to finish going through all four volumes of ASOIAF before ADWD releases in July.
I've considered doing that as well. Looking forward to ADWD. Also looking forward to Game of Thrones on TV. Camelot is Starz!'s version of that, and the first episode was pretty decent.

User avatar
Syphon the Sun
Toon Leader
Toon Leader
Posts: 2217
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2007 8:59 pm
Title: Ozymandias

Postby Syphon the Sun » Mon Mar 14, 2011 9:39 am

Robert J. Sawyer is quickly becoming one of my favorite authors.
Step softly; a dream lies buried here.

User avatar
Kill Devil Hill
Soldier
Soldier
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:17 pm

Postby Kill Devil Hill » Sun Mar 20, 2011 1:12 pm

I just checked out Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein and Dune by Frank Herbert. Which one should I read first?
We can shed our skins and swim into the darkened void beyond
We will dance among the world that orbit stars that aren't our sun
All the oxygen that trapped us in a carbon spider's web
Solar winds are whispering, you may hear the sirens of the dead.

User avatar
Gravity Defier
Commander
Commander
Posts: 7863
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:32 pm
Title: Ewok in Tauntaun-land

Postby Gravity Defier » Sun Mar 20, 2011 1:58 pm

I just checked out Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein and Dune by Frank Herbert. Which one should I read first?
Blasphemy ahead; keep your arms inside the vehicle at all times.


I'd say it depends on whether you want the better* of the two first or last. I found Stranger in a Strange Land to be completely intolerable and never finished it while I found Dune to be less so and was able to finish but wasn't impressed. I thought both were dry (haha, oh Dune/desert pun) reads but I know plenty of people who liked/loved one and/or both.

That wasn't helpful. Sorry.


*completely subjective
Se paciente y duro; algún día este dolor te será útil.

User avatar
neo-dragon
Commander
Commander
Posts: 2516
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:26 pm
Title: Huey Revolutionary
Location: Canada

Postby neo-dragon » Sun Mar 20, 2011 2:17 pm

I just checked out Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein and Dune by Frank Herbert. Which one should I read first?
In my opinion Stranger is a good read but Dune is one of my all time favourites. I don't know which you should read first so long as you give them both a try. I don't remember the specifics of Stranger very well having only read it once, but it's always great to have someone new to discuss Dune with.
"Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic."
- Frank Herbert's 'Dune'

User avatar
Kill Devil Hill
Soldier
Soldier
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:17 pm

Postby Kill Devil Hill » Sun Mar 20, 2011 2:51 pm

I just checked out Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein and Dune by Frank Herbert. Which one should I read first?
Blasphemy ahead; keep your arms inside the vehicle at all times.


I'd say it depends on whether you want the better* of the two first or last. I found Stranger in a Strange Land to be completely intolerable and never finished it while I found Dune to be less so and was able to finish but wasn't impressed. I thought both were dry (haha, oh Dune/desert pun) reads but I know plenty of people who liked/loved one and/or both.

That wasn't helpful. Sorry.


*completely subjective
I just checked out Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein and Dune by Frank Herbert. Which one should I read first?
In my opinion Stranger is a good read but Dune is one of my all time favourites. I don't know which you should read first so long as you give them both a try. I don't remember the specifics of Stranger very well having only read it once, but it's always great to have someone new to discuss Dune with.
So both of you are in agreement that Dune > Stranger in a Strange Land. I was considering reading Dune first anyway because it looked shorter. My sister read that book, but she claims that she wasn't mature enough to appreciate it or something.

Gravity, out of curiosity, what didn't you like about them? Was it just that they were both missing that umph?
We can shed our skins and swim into the darkened void beyond
We will dance among the world that orbit stars that aren't our sun
All the oxygen that trapped us in a carbon spider's web
Solar winds are whispering, you may hear the sirens of the dead.

User avatar
neo-dragon
Commander
Commander
Posts: 2516
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:26 pm
Title: Huey Revolutionary
Location: Canada

Postby neo-dragon » Sun Mar 20, 2011 3:28 pm

I was considering reading Dune first anyway because it looked shorter. My sister read that book, but she claims that she wasn't mature enough to appreciate it or something.
I think that Dune, and the subsequent books in the series (if you choose to read them as well), benefit from multiple readings. I love them for their depth and complexity.
"Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic."
- Frank Herbert's 'Dune'

User avatar
Kill Devil Hill
Soldier
Soldier
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:17 pm

Postby Kill Devil Hill » Sun Mar 20, 2011 3:46 pm

I was considering reading Dune first anyway because it looked shorter. My sister read that book, but she claims that she wasn't mature enough to appreciate it or something.
I think that Dune, and the subsequent books in the series (if you choose to read them as well), benefit from multiple readings. I love them for their depth and complexity.
I do plan on reading the subsequent books if Dune lives up to my expectations. 8)
We can shed our skins and swim into the darkened void beyond
We will dance among the world that orbit stars that aren't our sun
All the oxygen that trapped us in a carbon spider's web
Solar winds are whispering, you may hear the sirens of the dead.

User avatar
Luet
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 4451
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:49 pm
Title: Bird Nerd
First Joined: 01 Jul 2000
Location: Albany, NY

Postby Luet » Sun Mar 20, 2011 4:38 pm

I have read both more than once but I really didn't enjoy Dune either time, although I realize that it is a classic. I read it the second time because I didn't remember enough of it from the first time. I have read Stranger probably three times and I really do like it. But it's actually the only Heinlein that I've read and liked.
"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer." - Albert Camus in Return to Tipasa

User avatar
Kill Devil Hill
Soldier
Soldier
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:17 pm

Postby Kill Devil Hill » Sun Mar 20, 2011 6:12 pm

I have read both more than once but I really didn't enjoy Dune either time, although I realize that it is a classic. I read it the second time because I didn't remember enough of it from the first time. I have read Stranger probably three times and I really do like it. But it's actually the only Heinlein that I've read and liked.
Thanks for the response.
Foshizzle, I'll be reading Stranger in a Strange Land. It sounds really good. I did read a few pages in it and boy, do you need to make a mental transition to read it. Still, it sounded good. I think I will read Dune first though, although I'm not sure if I want to separate Dune and its sequels with Stranger in a Strange Land in transit. Oh well. We'll see how this goes.
We can shed our skins and swim into the darkened void beyond
We will dance among the world that orbit stars that aren't our sun
All the oxygen that trapped us in a carbon spider's web
Solar winds are whispering, you may hear the sirens of the dead.

User avatar
Gravity Defier
Commander
Commander
Posts: 7863
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:32 pm
Title: Ewok in Tauntaun-land

Postby Gravity Defier » Sun Mar 20, 2011 6:52 pm

Gravity, out of curiosity, what didn't you like about them? Was it just that they were both missing that umph?
Okay, I read them during or pre-2005 (Stranger) and 2008 (Dune), so I don't have the best recollection of how and where they went wrong.

I think with Stranger there was a strong, or at least interesting, start for me but about 2/3 through, I felt like it had just gotten so bogged down in...I don't even know what that nothing seemed to be happening. It got stuck. And so did I. I hardly ever quit on books I've started -I could probably count the number of times that has happened on one hand- but I just could not move in it. Perhaps part of it was that I was coming off of Starship Troopers, which I thoroughly enjoyed, and they were so very different.

Dune, I think, might have suffered from what I will call the LOTR Over-hype Syndrome (note: I've never read LOTR because 1) Too many snobby fans saying "[my] being uninterested in trying strips [me] of any credibility when it comes to taste" and 2) I'm getting to this), wherein it is considered to be a classic in its genre, and it's so popular, so well-loved, so held up that the book just can't live up to the hype. I was expecting this great thing and it was, to me, mediocre at the best. The more I'm told I should like it, the less I do. The best thing to happen as a result of me reading this book is that I now sometimes manage to catch pop culture references and jokes that I wouldn't have otherwise.
Se paciente y duro; algún día este dolor te será útil.

User avatar
Rei
Commander
Commander
Posts: 3068
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:31 pm
Title: Fides quaerens intellectum
First Joined: 24 Nov 2003
Location: Between the lines

Postby Rei » Sun Mar 20, 2011 7:01 pm

I just finished reading Jasper Fforde's FIRST AMONG SEQUELS, and I am SO glad the next book is already out. Now to track down a copy...

Also, I really wish the sequel to SHADES OF GREY were being published sooner.
Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connait point.
~Blaise Pascal


私は。。。誰?

Dernhelm

User avatar
Dr. Mobius
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 2524
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 12:11 pm
Title: Stayin' Alive
First Joined: 17 Aug 2002
Location: Evansville, IN
Contact:

Postby Dr. Mobius » Wed Mar 23, 2011 12:55 pm

A thought I had after this book was that Pat Rothfuss is going to be writing another three books. He has two general storylines going right now. Kvothe's life and what happens after Kvothe's life. Kvothe and Kote. I have the feeling that book 3 will finish up Kvothe's story up to the beginning chapters of the first book, and then we're going to get another trilogy covering Kote after he told the story of his life. There is no way that we can finish Kvothe's life and also resolve things happening in the world at the time of the Waystone Inn during book 3.
What do you think about Denna and her patron? I've read this theory about how Denna's patron may be one of the Chandrian, and that he/she's got her to learn to play the harp in order to rewrite their story and spread a different one with Lanre as the hero. (At the same time, they're killing off anyone who writes about their original story like Kvothe's family)
There's really not much to resolve at the Waystone. Pat has told us at the beginning and end of each book that Kvothe/Kote has given up and is waiting to die. If anything, Kvothe's condition is getting worse and worse during the interludes, not better. Upon completing his tale he's either going to spring into action and become his old self like Bast wants or he's going to go to bed and never wake up. My money's on the latter as it's considerably more believable and the former is one of the cliches Pat is trying to avoid with this trilogy.

The only real thing that needs to be resolved at the Waystone is why Kvothe has given up. My theory is that Denna is dead and Kvothe is either directly responsible or blames himself for her death. If that's the case, telling his story will have the opposite effect than Bast hopes as it will remind him what and who he's lost. Instead of rekindling an interest in the arcane and adventures, it'll reaffirm Kvothe's belief that he doesn't want to live in a world that doesn't include Denna, especially if he's the one who killed her. It would also explain your name in a box theory. He locked the aggressive parts of himself (smypathy/naming, Ketan, his temper) in the box to prevent himself from harming anyone again.

As for Denna's patron, I've suspected since she first got her mysterious patron in The Name of the Wind that it's probably one of the Chandrian, most likely Haliax/Lanre. Now her/her patron's song rewriting the buried history of the Lanre would seem to confirm that.

I'm also curious if Denna is supposed to be Meluan's sister or if Kvothe is simply seeing similarities to his beloved in the faces of other beautiful women (one of the girls he rescued from the false Ruh also reminded him of Denna).

On the topic of more books, I'm pretty sure Pat has said somewhere that this trilogy is all he's going to write about Kvothe. He's also said on his blog or in interviews, though, that he wants to tell other stories set this universe, either fleshing out minor characters like Skarpi or telling completely new stories set in countries on the map that are barely mentioned in the trilogy. Personally, I'd be interested in a parallel novel told from Denna's perspective so we could find out what she and her mysterious patron have been up to all this time, though that will most likely be revealed in the third book (and if my theory is correct probably has something to do with how she dies).
The enemy's fly is down.
Image

User avatar
Kill Devil Hill
Soldier
Soldier
Posts: 63
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2011 10:17 pm

Postby Kill Devil Hill » Fri Mar 25, 2011 9:40 pm

I'm barely eighty pages into Dune (I had quite a few exams this week), but it's actually really good so far. But I really like Duke Leto and I've got this really bad feeling that he's going to die. I'm sure of it, in fact. And I love Yueh despite his double-crossing. I mean, it's understandable.

Does the Glossary at the back of the book help at all? Like, would it be better if I simply found out what those odd words were by using context clues? I'm doing pretty well living off of context clues.
We can shed our skins and swim into the darkened void beyond
We will dance among the world that orbit stars that aren't our sun
All the oxygen that trapped us in a carbon spider's web
Solar winds are whispering, you may hear the sirens of the dead.

User avatar
neo-dragon
Commander
Commander
Posts: 2516
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 5:26 pm
Title: Huey Revolutionary
Location: Canada

Postby neo-dragon » Fri Mar 25, 2011 11:16 pm

How about you just refer to the glossary if you don't pick up on the meaning from the context?
"Deep in the human unconscious is a pervasive need for a logical universe that makes sense. But the real universe is always one step beyond logic."
- Frank Herbert's 'Dune'

User avatar
Gravity Defier
Commander
Commander
Posts: 7863
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:32 pm
Title: Ewok in Tauntaun-land

Postby Gravity Defier » Sat Mar 26, 2011 1:01 am

Life is cruel; people like Dune, all the good books show up at once and then I search for weeks/months for anything I might find remotely interesting. :p

I brought home way too many books but lucky for me, I can abuse the system if I need more time! In most cases, anyway. I did the crates this morning and so I got to see all the Shiny New Awesome and got first dibs. Lots of YA stuff found its way home with me, one adult book.

I need to make my way through:
Delirium - Lauren Oliver
The Gift - James Patterson
Z - Michael Thomas Ford
The Maze Runner - James Dashner
Rot & Run - Jonathan Maberry
Skin Hunger - Kathleen Duey
The Name of the Wind - Patrick Rothfuss


Clearly, I have a different definition of "good" than pretty much everyone here. :)
Se paciente y duro; algún día este dolor te será útil.

User avatar
Luet
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 4451
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:49 pm
Title: Bird Nerd
First Joined: 01 Jul 2000
Location: Albany, NY

Postby Luet » Sat Mar 26, 2011 7:21 am

The Maze Runner is the only one of those that I have read but I did like it. Let me know which others you really enjoy and I will definitely give them a try. I have been liking young adult books. I have a 13yo friend who gives me recs.
"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer." - Albert Camus in Return to Tipasa

User avatar
Gravity Defier
Commander
Commander
Posts: 7863
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:32 pm
Title: Ewok in Tauntaun-land

Postby Gravity Defier » Wed Mar 30, 2011 9:20 pm

Delirium - Lauren Oliver

Hmm. I finished this on Monday and have been stewing over how I feel about it. One thing that keeps popping up in my head is Twilight, in terms of how I felt the relationship was handled at times. However, and I think this is important, I think the setting for this story makes that similarity, if not completely forgivable, then at least understandable. I don't know how to further clarify without potentially spoiling but lest you think otherwise, I enjoyed the book, though I thought it was on the lighter/fluffier side overall; I tend to enjoy a grittier story more. I also think it handled young love, as I've seen it in some teens (and some adults), fairly enough.

I think it's funny to note, as an aside, that I was being completely cynical (read: myself) and thinking how, were I to live in a society where love was considered a disease and it was possible to be "cured" of it, I'd be all over that cure. The same way I say I'd be all about getting the Eternal Sunshine procedure of brain wiping done. All this, in both cases, while cheering for those in love. Better for you than for me, que no?


Anyway, I'm started on The Gift and I'm suddenly remembering that I find Patterson to be almost too simplistic in his writing, even/especially when collaborating. We'll see.
Se paciente y duro; algún día este dolor te será útil.

User avatar
megxers
Soldier
Soldier
Posts: 422
Joined: Sun Aug 02, 2009 7:04 pm
Title: is a girl!
Location: California
Contact:

Postby megxers » Mon Apr 04, 2011 7:33 pm

On one hand, I really hope that you're right, since I want Kote to start acting like Kvothe again, instead of this empty shell of himself.
On the other hand, Rothfuss takes a f****** long time writing books - so that might be another decade of waiting...

What do you think about Denna and her patron? I've read this theory about how Denna's patron may be one of the Chandrian, and that he/she's got her to learn to play the harp in order to rewrite their story and spread a different one with Lanre as the hero. (At the same time, they're killing off anyone who writes about their original story like Kvothe's family)

There's also theories I read about how Kvothe's name is locked up in his thrice locked box, that's why he can't really do sympathy or Ketan anymore. Because he's not really Kvothe anymore. Elodin did in fact hint at the idea that people can change their name, in the book.

More importantly, what's your thoughts on Kvothe becoming a manwhore and suddenly f****** everyone left and right?
So I've been reading up on my theories (thanks for the link Locke), and I am pretty convinced that one of the Chandrian is Denna's patron, but I haven't completely ruled out the theory that Bredon is Master Ash (or that these two theories are completely incompatible).

I noticed the lack of um, sex, in the first book, and it got to the point where I was kind of uncomfortable and skimming it. Overall, I think I liked NOTW better. Being chopped in half and losing the 100+ long sojourns would have helped a lot. It got to the point where I honestly was pretending that some of it was satire to get me through it...
So don't go worrying about me
It's not like I think about you constantly
So maybe I do, but that shouldn't affect
Your life anymore

User avatar
Gravity Defier
Commander
Commander
Posts: 7863
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:32 pm
Title: Ewok in Tauntaun-land

Postby Gravity Defier » Thu May 05, 2011 8:25 pm

Thanks to having the attention span from hell, I've probably not finished a book in close to a month and if I've finished one more recently, it took too long to do so.

I'm slowly making my way through Name of the Wind, which really is awesome; I wish I could focus on it.

In addition to pretty much my entire list of books I posted about 2-ish months ago, I have picked up two more books. The Grimm Legacy is one and an Alex Flinn book.

My goal is to finish one this Saturday, which should be more than doable seeing as I'll be home alone for most of the day.
Se paciente y duro; algún día este dolor te será útil.

User avatar
Luet
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 4451
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:49 pm
Title: Bird Nerd
First Joined: 01 Jul 2000
Location: Albany, NY

Postby Luet » Fri May 06, 2011 7:19 pm

Just read The Blind Assassin by Margaret Atwood. I don't think I've ever read anything by her that I didn't like. Then, due to lack of new books, I reread Lost Boys and am now reading Pastwatch. I do really love quite a few OSCs standalone novels. Next up is another by Atwood that I've never read called Bodily Harm.
"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer." - Albert Camus in Return to Tipasa

User avatar
Eaquae Legit
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 5185
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:30 pm
Title: Age quod agis
First Joined: 04 Feb 2002
Location: ^ Geez, read the sign.
Contact:

Postby Eaquae Legit » Fri May 13, 2011 6:05 pm

Holy crap, every week I'm reading about the Tiny One's development. It's so weird. In my mind, he's doing a PhD - year one is down, with all the preliminary source research done. This week he's writing about teeth. In two months (24 weeks) he'll do his upgrade and become a viable PhD candidate!
"Only for today, I will devote 10 minutes of my time to some good reading, remembering that just as food is necessary to the life of the body, so good reading is necessary to the life of the soul." -- Pope John XXIII

User avatar
Luet
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 4451
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 3:49 pm
Title: Bird Nerd
First Joined: 01 Jul 2000
Location: Albany, NY

Postby Luet » Fri May 13, 2011 6:12 pm

Do you know it's a boy or are you just using the generic "he"? If you don't know, are you going to find out?
"In the depth of winter, I finally learned that within me there lay an invincible summer." - Albert Camus in Return to Tipasa

User avatar
Eaquae Legit
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 5185
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:30 pm
Title: Age quod agis
First Joined: 04 Feb 2002
Location: ^ Geez, read the sign.
Contact:

Postby Eaquae Legit » Fri May 13, 2011 6:13 pm

Generic "he". We're not sure yet if we'll find out, but we're leaning toward not. Surprises are fun!
"Only for today, I will devote 10 minutes of my time to some good reading, remembering that just as food is necessary to the life of the body, so good reading is necessary to the life of the soul." -- Pope John XXIII

User avatar
Rei
Commander
Commander
Posts: 3068
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 6:31 pm
Title: Fides quaerens intellectum
First Joined: 24 Nov 2003
Location: Between the lines

Postby Rei » Fri May 13, 2011 6:26 pm

Besides, no sense in letting people buy pink or blue stuff en masse in advance.
Le coeur a ses raisons que la raison ne connait point.
~Blaise Pascal


私は。。。誰?

Dernhelm

User avatar
Dr. Mobius
Speaker for the Dead
Speaker for the Dead
Posts: 2524
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 12:11 pm
Title: Stayin' Alive
First Joined: 17 Aug 2002
Location: Evansville, IN
Contact:

Postby Dr. Mobius » Mon May 16, 2011 10:34 am

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N. K. Jemisin

I'm about 12 chapters in and it's pretty good so far.
The enemy's fly is down.
Image

User avatar
Gravity Defier
Commander
Commander
Posts: 7863
Joined: Tue Sep 26, 2006 7:32 pm
Title: Ewok in Tauntaun-land

Postby Gravity Defier » Fri May 20, 2011 9:25 pm

On one hand, I really hope that you're right, since I want Kote to start acting like Kvothe again, instead of this empty shell of himself.
I was thinking this exactly as I read about him being unable to perform sympathy or even fight the two men who set out to rob him. (Dear Bast, if you want to light a fire under Kvothe's ass...)
What do you think about Denna and her patron? I've read this theory about how Denna's patron may be one of the Chandrian, and that he/she's got her to learn to play the harp in order to rewrite their story and spread a different one with Lanre as the hero. (At the same time, they're killing off anyone who writes about their original story like Kvothe's family)
I thought of this as soon as she started describing his behavior. The fact that she ends up in the Severen area around the time Kvothe is sent off to kill the bandits and one of them is there made me think it even more. The timing isn't quite perfect, mind you, but it's so damn close, it can be worked with.
There's also theories I read about how Kvothe's name is locked up in his thrice locked box, that's why he can't really do sympathy or Ketan anymore. Because he's not really Kvothe anymore. Elodin did in fact hint at the idea that people can change their name, in the book.
I quite like this theory. It would make me feel better if there were a good reason for him to be living such a mundane life. "Waiting to die," indeed.
More importantly, what's your thoughts on Kvothe becoming a manwhore and suddenly f****** everyone left and right?
The only purpose any of that seemed to serve was to get Denna pissed off at him. If that was all it was good for, I don't see why I had to comb through ~150 pages of him having lame-ass sex when the rest of the story was ten million times more interesting. My view of him suffered significantly for this and I don't care how old, or young as the defense will be, he was; he was constantly harping on how he wanted to be treated older, since he never acted/spoke/thought his age before and then what, a fairy offers him some sex and even though he's desperately in love with someone else (no, really, he is...Fela was right about him on that score), he's just going to throw all caution and intelligent thought to the wind and go for it? He seriously made me question men in general with that behavior.



Random thoughts: I disliked many parts of the Adem culture but I thought the handspeak was fascinating in a way that makes it immensely more compelling than the idea of ASL. I wish I knew some of the gestures, even though I'm perfectly aware it's a made-up language.

Elodin is, hands down, my favorite character in the series, followed by Sim.


My back hurts a little bit from hauling this book around while riding my bike.
Se paciente y duro; algún día este dolor te será útil.


Return to “Milagre Town Square”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Ahrefs [Bot] and 16 guests