Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows SPOILER Thread

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Postby Eaquae Legit » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:15 pm

What I don't get is why they wore the locket at ALL! I mean, here's Hermione with her Bag O' Holding, and Harry with his Only I Can Open It Bag, and they know the locket's having a horrible effect! Seriously, did no one think to just store it somewhere safe? It's probably even safer in Harry's bag than anywhere else!

Mind, I still loved it. And I didn't mind the aimless wandering in the woods, because really, that's probably the most realistic part of it all!

EDIT: Regarding Voldy's stupidity in hiding the diadem:

I'm guessing that when Voldy hid the diadem he was looking for a room that Dumbledore wouldn't find it in. Dumbledore's the only one he was actually afraid of - he was waaay to cocky, especially before his failure at the Potters, to worry about anyone else. All the students who were looking for a hiding place were probably specifying "where the teachers/Filch can't find this" as well. And in that case, his arrogance was his undoing, never thinking that mere children would know about horcruxes, figure out which was his, and be able to destroy it.
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Postby Young Val » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:30 pm

question: did we find out who else was there when voldemort killed harry's parents?
a cat?

JKR never said there was anyone else, but fans made an assumption when she said the invisibility cloak was relevant.



she DID say that a muggle/non-magic person would perform magic late in life. and she didn't keep that promise, nor several others, such as what did Dudley see when the dementors attacked him, and so on and so forth ad infinitum.





although i agree that Voldemort was arrogant and that was the lynchpin to his downfall, it still doesn't make sense that a hidden room was the only security he gave the diadem. the diary was always meant to be used, so fine. but the locket was excruciating to get to. even the (lame) hufflepuff cup at least was enchanted so that it burnt you and then exploded into a zillion replicas. we'll apparently never know what the deal with the ring was, but it was obviously pretty protected as well.

Voldemort sucks at protecting the diadem. or, JKR is a fan of convenient plot contrivances. (most likely, a little of both).
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Postby starlooker » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:34 pm

At the very least, it should've been cursed.

For heaven's sake.

I'm sorry. The locket Horcrux locale is the one thing that really did set me up to be disappointed. I figured the other locations would be at least as cool.

Bella's To-Do List

*Go to the gym (got to get that wand arm in shape!)
*kick puppies
*practice cruciating muggle children
*pick up some groceries
*stop in at the bank with gold cup of Voldie's <3
*make supper
*practice maniac evil laugh in the mirror. Record and listen for best effect.

Yeesh.

Yeah, I know. Dragons. Hot burning metal. All that.

All the same.

EDIT: Oh, yeah. Also, through the whole thing I was thinking, "Wouldn't that moleskin hidey pouch make a great place to put a cursed locket that keeps tormenting you?" But noooooooo.
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Postby Eaquae Legit » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:41 pm

I thought the cup was pretty protected. I mean, what would be the odds that someone would convince a goblin to help them break into a vault? They were pretty clear in Philosopher's Stone that Gringotts was the safest place to store something, save for Hogwarts. I can accept the cup as being safely stored.

I can't explain the lack of a curse on the diadem. I came up with something for the Room, but the lack of cursedness is beyond my creativity at the moment.

Also, I really, really hate typing "horcruxes." I know it's a made-up word and she can pluralise it however she wants, but "horcruces" would have been so much better.
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Postby neo-dragon » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:49 pm

Maybe I'm forgetting something, but do we really know that the diadem wasn't cursed? It was destroyed pretty much by accident before anyone got a chance to do anything like try to wear it or something.

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Postby starlooker » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:54 pm

Harry picked up the diadem in book 6 when he put it on the statue.

And I'm not saying the cup wasn't well-protected. I'm saying, it was BORINGLY protected. I mean, for God's sake, if I wanted to protect something of mine, yeah, I'd probably put it in a bank, too. Woohoo. I know that it was supposedly safe there. Just as safe as anything else any other wizard put there. All the other treasure multiplied, as well. And this was apparently not an uncommon trick, as the goblin knew about it right away.

And in Bellatrix's vault? Yeesh. I mean, it should be something that Voldemort figures only he can get to, rather than something he has to rely on others for. If you're going to use Gringotts, can there at least be one little trick to it that the goblins don't know about, one little unusual something?
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Postby NWS » Tue Jul 24, 2007 6:56 pm

When he was a student, he opened the chamber of secrets, which was supposed by many to only be a legend. I can't really fault him for thinking in discovering the room of requirements which wasn't even known as a fable for thinking he'd stumbled into a deep secret. And he was correct in thinking that only he could find it there. I mean, it's a well known lost artifact with a replica in the same building that how many students have looked at without noticing? The only person who notices it is Harry and evn with three of them searching, Harry is the one that finds it because he carries a peice of Voldemort with him. The room worked.

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Postby starlooker » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:00 pm

Ya'll are missing my point.

It's not that they weren't smart. Although, NWS, all the contorting in the world doesn't make me think that, given VM's passion for secrecy and paranoia, putting it in the RoR wasn't out of character. But I digress.

It's not that they weren't smart.

It's that they were LAME.
Last edited by starlooker on Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby neo-dragon » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:02 pm

So, just out of curiosity, what (if any) spoilers did people know before reading them in the book? I was totally spoiler free.

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Postby starlooker » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:05 pm

Proud to be spoiler free!

Although, I did spoil it for a friend of mine. Over his loud protests, I told him how totally awesome I thought it was when JKR introduced the robots in the second to last chapter ;)
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Postby Eaquae Legit » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:05 pm

I've always wondered. I'm a big fantasy reader. I have a basic understanding of chemisty, physics, geology, etc. If I got plopped suddenly into a world like Harry's, as the person I am now, would my magic work differently? Would I be uncontent with a "spell to do X" and start looking for underlying causes, ways to enchant things subtly for big effects?

I think the wizard world would be well served to send their research wizards to muggle schools for higher education.
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Postby Ua Lava » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:09 pm

What I find to be the most amusing part of this book:

In order for DH to be a faithful translation of a children's novel, most people think it needs a R rating.
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Postby Young Val » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:13 pm

Ya'll are missing my point.

It's not that they weren't smart. Although, NWS, all the contorting in the world doesn't make me think that, given VM's passion for secrecy and paranoia, putting it in the RoR wasn't out of character. But I digress.

It's not that they weren't smart.

It's that they were LAME.

please. i'm apparently missing many things, but not this particular point.

:D



back the point Ali said earlier, about Hermione not recognizing the Rook, and Ron explaining it....I thought it had been made quite clear that Hermione is a very poor chess player. In one of the early books, 1 or 2, possibly 3, Harry mentions this, but he and Ron like her to play, because losing is good for her. And Ron is, of course, the chess player of the three. I wasn't bothered by that. (Something abut DH that didn't bother Kelly! wow!)
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hear the bells are
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Postby starlooker » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:17 pm

I wasn't talking to you, Kelly -- I figured you got that point :)

Re: the rook, that was my point, not Ali's.

And you don't have to be a good chess player to know the NAMES of the pieces. Basic chess vocabulary is basically -- basic vocabulary. Unless she was not around and listening when they were playing or actually never learned anything about it -- yeah, right, she didn't know the definition. Or, as mentioned, via semantic networking, if she ever even heard the word around them when they were playing chess, she should've gone to that definition rather than, "bird" unless she'd just been reading "Birds of the World" or some such.

You have your petty annoyances, and I have mine.

Oh, added to that. One more petty annoyance is the number of elipses she used when her characters were in crisis. However, as you all know, I have a weird thing about improper/over use of elipses and this should be categorically ignored by anyone who does not share this obsession.

I did love the book, especially the first time through. But I'm sad the whole thing's over, and am now buisily thinking of things I want to be changed that will never be changed because it's over.
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Postby neo-dragon » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:26 pm

In order for DH to be a faithful translation of a children's novel, most people think it needs a R rating.
I don't think it needs an R-rating. In fact, I think making a Harry Potter movie that you have to be over 17 to see goes against the very spirit of the series. DH was NOT more violent or gruesome than say, The Lord of the Rings, those films all got PG-13.
I think the wizard world would be well served to send their research wizards to muggle schools for higher education.
I've wondered exactly how wizard education works. Muggle-born wizards and special cases like Harry presumably attend muggle schools up to the age of 10, and that's all the muggle education they get. Hogwarts only teaches magical stuff, so no basic reading, writing, math, science, etc. That means many wizards only have the equivalent of a 6th grade education in these areas. It's a wonder that the literacy rate in the wizarding world isn't shamefully low! I assume that pure-bloods and half-bloods are home schooled prior to Hogwarts, so they're probably better off since their parents know that they won't be getting anymore formal reading/writing education.

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Postby Young Val » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:47 pm

true. and you're welcome to your petty annoyances. i'm just quick to be positive about this book whenever i can--stop the mobs from stoning me to death.


all the Potter-philes at work today got together and discussed the book over lunch. while i was the only one (predictably) who hated it--everyone present thought that JKR did a huge disservice to Hermione and half thought Dumbledore was out of character. i rejoiced! i'll take what i can get.
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Postby starlooker » Tue Jul 24, 2007 7:53 pm

Can you expand on the whole, "Dumbledore was out of character" thing? I honestly don't understand that. At all. He was out of his role as teacher/mentor, yes, but I really saw it as being more character-expanding than character-wronging.
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Postby neo-dragon » Tue Jul 24, 2007 8:11 pm

Can you expand on the whole, "Dumbledore was out of character" thing? I honestly don't understand that. At all. He was out of his role as teacher/mentor, yes, but I really saw it as being more character-expanding than character-wronging.
I agree. The thing is, through out the series we're not given a complete or objective view of characters. We see everyone and everything from Harry's perspective, based on what Harry knows or thinks. In books 1-6 we only saw Dumbledore as a young child sees an invincible and infallible hero. Until DH, we had never really seen Albus Dumbledore developed as a character with a past, with flaws, with fears, with regrets. I can't say that he was out of character in DH because in a way this is the book that his character was truly introduced in.

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Postby Young Val » Tue Jul 24, 2007 8:14 pm

i've just popped some tylenol pm, so i can't promise that this will be coherent. but i WILL attempt to stop letting my emotions present my arguments for me.


i genuinely liked getting Dumbledore's backstory. i liked knowing that Dumbledore is falliable--which we heard from his own mouth in OotP. this had a humanizing effect; Dumbledore is multi-dimensional, not just a super-santa-claus-wise-kind-grandfatherly-good-guy. he also sometimes Makes Mistakes.

and i will certainly be the first to line up and say that he was manipulative. i mean, come on. but not in this sinister, vaguely malicious way.

i have no problem believing that Dumbledore was a bit Percy Weasley-ish in his youth. i have no problem believing he befriended Grindelwald in his youth.

what i DO have a problem with is the revelation that he was (and apparently still is--up until his death) power-hungry.

that Dumbledore ever sought to be the Master of Death is laughable to me. unless virtually everything he ever said in any of the prior books is a lie. he's always prattling on about death being the next great adventure, and there being far worse things than death, and so on and so forth. the idea that he ever sought to conquer or manipulate death (especially as late as in the 6th book) is completely out of character, as far as i'm concerned.

as is the idea that he ever thought it was a good idea for wizards to rule over muggles, "for the greater good" or otherwise. i can't reconcile it in my mind that the Dumbledore we've known for 6 books is madly power-hungry.

he repeatedly turned down the Ministry of Magic position--not because he had no interest in government but because he was afraid he'd be corrupted by the power?


no.


i'm sorry. no.

power-hungry Dumbledore is just out of character. i can believe he thought he was too good for his family at one point, and i can even entertain the idea that he was the one who accidentally killed his sister.

but not being power-hungry. to me, it's against everything i think Dumbledore ever was. i can't reconcile it. it makes Dumbledore a jerk. and i can't exist in a world where Dumbledore is a jerk.
you snooze, you lose
well I have snozzed and lost
I'm pushing through
I'll disregard the cost
I hear the bells
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and I can
hear the bells are
ringing joyful and triumphant

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Postby starlooker » Tue Jul 24, 2007 8:29 pm

Oh, see, that's not really how I understood it.

I saw the whole, "For the greater good" thing as being an example of how powerfully Dumbledore -- and his family -- were affected by his younger sister's being attacked (in whatever way) by the three muggle boys. That he wanted a world where his sister wasn't a freak, was protected, etc. Not so much because he adored Ariana, but because of the effects here traumatization had for everyone in his family (particularly his father). So, it made sense to me that as a brilliant young wizard, he would be seeking ways of redressing that. He said that hearing about being "Master of Death" meant -- to him -- invincible. It didn't so much mean that he was afraid of death, but that having the Hallows would assure his and Grindelwald's success. And then, after seeing what power actually looks like in the wrong hands via Grindelwald's treatment of his family, he renounced it and became Dumbledore we love, who set himself up against Voldemort. I didn't think he ever again really wanted to master the Hallows. I figure he was looking at the cloak from curiousity, and maybe sentimentality, but not power. And he actually says the reason he was tempted by the ring in Book 6 was not because of desire of any kind of mastery over death but because he wanted to apologize to his family. Which I think is entirely different from putting on the ring due to being power mad. It doesn't make him a jerk. It makes him a man who is aware of his greatest weakness, and since giving into temptation once, as a foolish boy, has chosen to resist it again, and again, and again. Even to the point of taming the wand with the bloodiest history in wizardry, so that it did not kill anymore.

So, I'm okay with that. Someone who is tempted by power who again and again uses it -- jerk. Someone who is tempted by power who again and again resists it -- hero.

Although, honestly, I think putting in the bit about the Ministry was a bit much. Dumbledore would've hated the ministry for many, many reasons. Power was not the issue there -- he'd've been a lousy politician. However. *shrugs* Knowing him as the kind man we do, it's easy to toss that off. However, he's probably far more afraid of himself than is realistic -- but, then again, maybe he knows best. I think he's a bit harsher on himself for his supposed power hunger than need be, but that's to be expected from somebody who has his depth and sense of responsibility.
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Postby Epi » Tue Jul 24, 2007 9:39 pm

I just finished the book today. Purposefully read it slowly so that I could let it sink in. It was hard to basically not use any non-corporate internet sites for the last few days, but I managed to be blog and forum free for a while!

Either way, I thought the book was a fitting end to the series. Let's not kid ourselves, the books were never great works of literature. What entralled everyone was the magic and the adventure of it all, and this book pulled through on that respect.

Yes there was no grand epicness, the story was a bit contrived and there was no great narrative, but really I believe that Rowling had a 'grand idea' about how the story would work as much as I believe Lucas for Star Wars. The simple fact is, it was made up as she went along, and the closer we get to the end of the series, the closer it all fits together.

I was pretty happy that at least my theory that I formed with Snape killing Dumbledore being a setup and my thoughts of Snape loving Lily were at least true. As for Harry being a Horcrux thing, it's too bad because it takes away from the uniqueness of Harry being able to speak parseltongue and all that, but then again it works. Harry really is just a normally talented (but not spectacular) wizard who gets a lot of outside help and luck in order to go through his trials. He isn't some super wizard like Dumbledore but then again... that's the point!

As for the deaths, no death in the entire series was ever really epic, so I don't see why anyone's in this book would have been. Death, especially when done by Voldy is presented as random senseless acts of violence, and that really sums up the message in the book, which is that evil isn't anything glorious at all... it's just kind of dumb.

And for the rest? Well it was about what I expected. The Order of the Phoenix is still my favorite book in the series, but really these books are just good fun. In real life, a real dictator/evil dude would have just rounded up all the Order of the Phoenix members right away (instead of letting Mr. Weasley work at the ministry!), especially when they were so blatantly abusing their power anyway by casting restricted spells and searching homes with no real pretense. In the real world, there would have been some sort of tactics in the battles instead of just a random schoolyard fight which all the Harry Potter fights are presented as. I keep thinking that if anyone had any real strategic sense how things would be completely different. One could imagine Ender dreaming up some ridiculous plan where even just the kids in the DA would have destroyed all the Death Eaters with nothing to spare. In the real world, parents would have pulled their kids out of school for fear instead of having them all attend. I mean seriously, they're fighting a WAR and everyone still goes off to school even though death eaters are IN CHARGE of the place?


Looking back at the entire series, I do have a few regrets. In the beginning Malfoy was made up to be such a 'arch-nemesis' to Harry but really he turned out to be nothing. In the beginning the school stuff was so fantastical, Quiddich was so awesome, but then all of that came to naught. While the overarching story was fun, what really got me personally into the books in the first place was the idea of attending a magical boarding school. I think if there was just a series of books about growing up, attending a magical boarding school, and completely leaving out Voldy's return (you could leave the fact that he killed Harry's parents in to add some character) would have made for a great series in itself. But alas that is not so.


P.S. Just one thing about the cloak... if it's so perfect and so powerful, how come Dumbledore can see right through it (as in book 3)?
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Postby locke » Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:13 pm

edit: I didn't realize there was a page three when I replied. :P
question: did we find out who else was there when voldemort killed harry's parents?
Rowling wrote her way out of this by giving more details and rules governing the fidelious charm that to some degree contradict the rather confusing explanation she posted on her website a couple of years ago. Basically those website rules insisted there had to be someone else there when Harry died, so it became a semi canon fact that there must have been another party (a lot of people theorized the invisibility cloak would come into play). But as she laid it out in the book, there needn't have been another witness in play.

I definitely thought the double entendre re Ron's bday present to Harry was intended. But I thought what Alfonso Cuaron would do with Ginny's bday present would be much naughtier, if they brought him back to direct Deathly Hallows. I don't think he could resist the laugh potential of Ron bursting in on a slightly bewildered Harry clutching his sister (Harry is so bewildered because Ginny has just magicked herself out of all her clothes). Really, there's no other way to imagine that scene with Cuaron directing, imo, if you've seen Y Tu Mama Tambien. And honestly, magic should be good for something useful, right Cuaron?
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Postby neo-dragon » Tue Jul 24, 2007 10:30 pm


what i DO have a problem with is the revelation that he was (and apparently still is--up until his death) power-hungry.

that Dumbledore ever sought to be the Master of Death is laughable to me. unless virtually everything he ever said in any of the prior books is a lie. he's always prattling on about death being the next great adventure, and there being far worse things than death, and so on and so forth. the idea that he ever sought to conquer or manipulate death (especially as late as in the 6th book) is completely out of character, as far as i'm concerned.

as is the idea that he ever thought it was a good idea for wizards to rule over muggles, "for the greater good" or otherwise. i can't reconcile it in my mind that the Dumbledore we've known for 6 books is madly power-hungry.

he repeatedly turned down the Ministry of Magic position--not because he had no interest in government but because he was afraid he'd be corrupted by the power?


no.


i'm sorry. no.

power-hungry Dumbledore is just out of character. i can believe he thought he was too good for his family at one point, and i can even entertain the idea that he was the one who accidentally killed his sister.

but not being power-hungry. to me, it's against everything i think Dumbledore ever was. i can't reconcile it. it makes Dumbledore a jerk. and i can't exist in a world where Dumbledore is a jerk.
The way I see it, not trusting yourself with power is not a sign of being power hungry. It's more of an indication that you know yourself and your weaknesses. Dumbledore admits that he wanted glory, which is quite understandable and human if you're young and incredibly gifted and the people around you never let you forget it. He admits that he once believed (a VERY long time ago) that wizards should rule over muggles. But indeed he did believe that this would serve a greater good. This is nothing more than the misguided reasoning of an arrogant young man, far from the megalomania of someone like Voldemort. As for wanting to be a master of death, all he really wanted to do was be able to see his sister again and maybe ask for forgiveness, and that's why he put on the ring. This is just a tragic weakness. He never feared his own death or sought the power to prevent it.

I don't interpret any of this as being indicative of power hunger. In fact, it seems to me that Dumbledore (or at least the version of him that Harry saw in his head) was needlessly hard on himself. He recognized his own failings and weaknesses and therefore he feared having too much power, even though as Harry said, in all likelihood he would have done far better than Fudge or that other guy as Minister. As it is, Dumbledore had enormous power as the headmaster of Hogwarts in that he directly influenced multiple generations of wizards, so much so that he ended up with his own loyal army who opposed Voldemort in his name up until the end. Yet this influential power did not corrupt him.

No, Albus Dumbledore was not power hungry. By the time we meet him in book 1 his greatest character flaws were an excessively guilty conscious and a fear of doing more harm than good. That's what I got out of DH, and that seems very much in character to me.

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Postby locke » Wed Jul 25, 2007 1:40 am

I just realized something

"poof! no adverbs" he said satisfyingly.
So, Lone Star, now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb.

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Postby NWS » Wed Jul 25, 2007 7:37 am

I don't think it requires any "contorting" at all. I'm hardly making the room of requirements or Harry's connection with Voldemort into anything other than or more than it has been presented throughout the books. And Hogwarts was, after all, one of the places Voldemort considered special to him. I do agree that the bank vault was an odd choice, but no more odd to entrust Bella than Lucius.

As to Dumbledore, uh, wow and I glad I am not the same person I was at 17. Or at 20. Or at 25. People do change and mature for the rest of their lives. That isn't to say that he isn't responsible for his wasn't responsible for his actions at the time, but to expect the old wise man to have been born an old wise man seems to me harder to swallow than what was in the book.

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Postby locke » Wed Jul 25, 2007 3:03 pm

it seems the horcruxes were cursed. The diary wasn't dangerous until you used it, wrote in it. The locket wasn't dangerous until you put it on, likewise the Ring. I imagine the cup would have been dangerous if you tried to invoke its magical properties and drink or brew a potion with it. I would imagine anyone who put the diadem on their head would have been similarly effected, if not moreso.

And more often than not, the best place to hide something is in plain sight. And we don't even know if the room of requirement appeared as the vast place 'where everything is hidden' for Voldemort. He may have only 'asked' for 'a room where Dumbledore can never find this,' or 'a room where I can hide this' and the room may have appeared much differently to him.
So, Lone Star, now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb.

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Postby neo-dragon » Wed Jul 25, 2007 4:52 pm

Something I said over on hatrack:
I always thought that it would have been nice if Harry became the defence against dark arts teacher at Hogwarts. I mean, he was practically doing that job during his 5th year when he formed DA, and look how good his students turned out. Many of them were dueling Death Eaters and holding their own in the final battle! They could even all form patronuses, which is something that was thought to be beyond the abilities of most inexperienced wizards. And who in the wizarding world wouldn't like the idea of Harry Potter training kids to defend themselves against dark magic? He certainly has the practical experience and an impressive track record.
Anyone agree?

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Postby Young Val » Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:14 pm

i always knew it would be Neville that taught at Hogwarts.

as good as Harry was with the DA i really can't see him teaching. i always figured it would be an Auror or nothing.
you snooze, you lose
well I have snozzed and lost
I'm pushing through
I'll disregard the cost
I hear the bells
so fascinating and
I'll slug it out
I'm sick of waiting
and I can
hear the bells are
ringing joyful and triumphant

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Postby locke » Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:43 am

Also, regarding the room of requirement. It did Harry not a bit of good when he tried to require the room to let him find Draco. So if Dumbledore were trying to find the room the diadem was hidden in he never would have found it. I imagine while still in school but after he discovered the room of requirement, Tom Riddle tested the ability for someone trying to find something he had hidden quite thoroughly and was more than satisfied that it had the full protection of all the power behind the magic of the Hogwarts grounds. But he never realized that it could still be found by looking for a generic place where everything is hidden. Only someone wanting to hide something would find that room, anyone trying to find something not theirs would be thwarted.

I doubt Harry would still want to be an Auror. It just sets him up to be attacked by everyone still enraptured by the idea of the elder wand. Plus he would have to work for the ministry. and Kingsley or not, beaurocrats by and large remain the same.

I like to think he either worked with George or started his own venture. A broomstick shop.
So, Lone Star, now you see that evil will always triumph because good is dumb.

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Postby Young Val » Thu Jul 26, 2007 10:18 am

i know i swore i'd quit it, but the Horcrux thing just drives me nuts.

If Basilisk Venom destroys Horcruxes, and Harry is a Horcrux, and Harry was bit by the Basilisk in the Chamber of Secrets in year 2.... then shouldn't he... not be a Horcrux any longer?

(I mean, he shouldn't be one ANYway, but you know).
you snooze, you lose
well I have snozzed and lost
I'm pushing through
I'll disregard the cost
I hear the bells
so fascinating and
I'll slug it out
I'm sick of waiting
and I can
hear the bells are
ringing joyful and triumphant

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Postby jotabe » Thu Jul 26, 2007 10:57 am

hehehe i leave for a while and i find everything upside down :lol:

I have to say i really loved DH, except for what most people mention:

-They were too long in hiding... unless JK wanted us to feel the dispair the chars were feeling (what she accomplished), it had little point. Specially after Ron tells them that the reason they were being tracked easily was because of the taboo on... erm... you-know-who's name.

-The epilogue was cheesy, even for me (i have a huge tolerance for cheese!). The sandwich was also excessive.

-Too little of Snape!

Ok, now into the harry-horcrux... i don't think Harry was a Horcrux, not in the strict meaning of it. From what i understood, the scar worked like a horcrux, but not being a real, proper one. The way Dumbledore words it "you were the seventh horcrux" (more or less literally) tells me that the Harry was a different case ("in essence divided"!!! in Horcruxes you can't really destroy the piece of soul without destroying the container). You Know Who only wanted to make 6 horcruces (i join Ali's crussade! Latin plural ftw!), and he only made 6. The one he never intended to make, it wasn't a real horcrux after all.
It's as when people speak of the 5th Beatle (who wasn't actually a Beatle), or Alien being the 8th passenger (Alien wasn't really a passenger). Something unknown, hidden... analogous but essentially different.

(Yes, i have always been in the Harry-is-not-a-horcrux side :D)
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Postby Claire » Thu Jul 26, 2007 12:48 pm

i know i swore i'd quit it, but the Horcrux thing just drives me nuts.

If Basilisk Venom destroys Horcruxes, and Harry is a Horcrux, and Harry was bit by the Basilisk in the Chamber of Secrets in year 2.... then shouldn't he... not be a Horcrux any longer?

(I mean, he shouldn't be one ANYway, but you know).
Perhaps phoenix tears can heal a horcrux too.

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Postby Young Val » Fri Jul 27, 2007 10:10 am

http://diogenes-sinope.blogspot.com/200 ... ilers.html


i think i like this version better.
you snooze, you lose
well I have snozzed and lost
I'm pushing through
I'll disregard the cost
I hear the bells
so fascinating and
I'll slug it out
I'm sick of waiting
and I can
hear the bells are
ringing joyful and triumphant

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Postby NWS » Fri Jul 27, 2007 3:18 pm

Wow. I can't even pick a favorite part of that. :lol:

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Postby ValentineNicole » Fri Jul 27, 2007 4:05 pm

I can! I love how Dudley says "You are the wind beneath my wings" to Harry.
LMAO...that was brilliant


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